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We are a contract based EMG testing company. Electromyography, or EMG, is paired with nerve conduction studies, NCV, to evaluate the integrity of the peripheral nervous system and how it interacts with the muscles. We provide in-house services on a referral basis.
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Monday - Friday 08:00AM - 5:00PM
Saturday - Sunday CLOSED
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Mon - Fri 8.00 - 5.00 / Weekend - CLOSED

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Frequently Asked Questions

EMG Solutions / Frequently Asked Questions
Who are we, and What do we do?

We are a contract based EMG testing company. Electromyography, or EMG, is paired with nerve conduction studies, NCV, to evaluate the integrity of the peripheral nervous system and how it interacts with the muscles. We provide in-house services on a referral basis.

What is EMG?

Electromyography (EMG) is a diagnostic procedure to assess the health of muscles and the nerve cells that control them (motor neurons). Motor neurons transmit electrical signals that cause muscles to contract. An EMG translates these signals into graphs, sounds or numerical values that a specialist interprets. An EMG uses tiny devices called electrodes to transmit or detect electrical signals. During a needle EMG, a needle electrode inserted directly into a muscle records the electrical activity in that muscle. A nerve conduction study, another part of an EMG, uses electrodes taped to the skin (surface electrodes) to measure the speed and strength of signals traveling between two or more points. EMG results can reveal nerve dysfunction, muscle dysfunction or problems with nerve-to-muscle signal transmission.

How can an EMG help?

If you have leg/arm pain or numbness, you may have these tests to find out how much your nerves are being affected. These tests check how well your spinal cord, nerve roots, nerves, and muscles that control your legs and arms are working.

How do I prepare for an EMG?

Medications
Mestinon: This medication must be discontinued for 12 hours prior to the study
All other medications are fine to continue taking
Please Refrain from wearing Lotions, Creams, Perfumes, and Oils as these can these can interact with the equipment not allowing it to work properly.
Jewelry will have to be removed prior to testing
Please wear loose fitting clothing or athletic wear so that your legs, arms, neck, and back can easily be accessed.
The test will take approximately one hour

What is NCV?

A nerve conduction study (NCS), also called a nerve conduction velocity (NCV) test–is a measurement of the speed of conduction of an electrical impulse through a nerve. NCS can determine nerve damage and destruction. During the test, the nerve is stimulated, usually with surface electrode patches attached to the skin. Two electrodes are placed on the skin over the nerve. One electrode stimulates the nerve with a very mild electrical impulse and the other electrode records it. The resulting electrical activity is recorded by another electrode. This is repeated for each nerve being tested. The nerve conduction velocity (speed) is then calculated by measuring the distance between electrodes and the time it takes for electrical impulses to travel between electrodes.

Are Physical Therapists qualified to Perform EMG/NCV?

CAPTE instruction in electrophysiological testing is in the basic professional education curriculum. NCS/EMG is described as part of physical therapy practice of tests and measurements in all four practice areas of the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice. Minimum eligibility requirements for ABPTS certification in Clinical Electrophysiology require 2,000 hours of direct patient care in the specialty area within the last 10 years, 25% (500) of which must have occurred within the last three (3) years. The applicant must include evidence of performing a minimum of 500 peer reviewed, complete electroneuromyography examinations during those hours. The American Board of Medical Examiners administers certification testing.

Is Medicare accepted?

Medicare, the largest payer in the United States, reimburses for NCS/EMG provided by physical therapists. On April 19, 2001, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services issued Program Memorandum B-01-28, which states that physical therapists who are board-certified in clinical electrophysiology by the ABPTS may perform, and be reimbursed for, NCS/EMG without the supervision of a physician. In September 2001, CMS expanded this policy to cover NCS/EMG services provided by physical therapists who are not ABPTS certified if they had provided NCS/EMG services to Medicare patients prior to May 1, 2001. This policy was renewed in December 2010. A new CMS transmittal was issued in March 2013, with final policy established and published in the Medicare Benefit Policy Manual in 2014.